Hard Water Problems: Common Myths of Water Softeners

With the amount of news available to us today, seemingly endless amount of information broadcasted to us about water quality issues in different places around the world, and here locally in the Philadelphia and South Jersey area, it’s difficult to understand what exactly you might need to do about your hard water problems.

Needs can vary from area to area, and home to home based on what possible contaminants are in your water, whether you use well or municipal sources, and a variety of other factors. You might require a water filter and a water softener, but it’s important to know that a water softener will not filter out certain harmful contaminants, and likewise, a water filter will not make your hard water soft.

Water Softeners Are Too Expensive

quality water softener from Culligan® can pay itself off, and actually save you money the more you use it. It can help reduce water heating bills, extend the length of your other household appliances, reduce your laundry and dish detergent usage 50 to 75%.

Water Softeners are Difficult to Install or Maintain

For as little as $10/month, you can buy, lease, or rent a water softener from Culligan, then sit back and relax! Let us take care of the installation and maintenance for you. A Culligan Water Softener is also backed by a comprehensive warranty. Don’t settle for a transactional approach online or run off to your local big box retailer. Your water is more precious than that. Trust the water experts at Culligan, with more than 80 years in the industry.

Water Softeners Make Your Water Taste Salty

Just because you need salts to operate your water softener does not mean the taste of table salt will permeate your drinking water. Salt is needed for ion exchange, a process that takes minerals that make water hard such as calcium and magnesium out of your water system.

Likewise, some people worry – particularly those on low-sodium diets – that softened water is not healthy for you. According to the Mayo Clinic:

Regular tap water contains very little sodium. The amount of sodium a water softener adds to tap water depends on the “hardness” of the water. Hard water contains large amounts of calcium and magnesium. Some water-softening systems replace calcium and magnesium ions with sodium ions. The higher the concentration of calcium and magnesium, the more sodium needed to soften the water. Even so, the added sodium doesn’t add up to much.

 An 8-ounce (237-milliliter) glass of softened water generally contains less than 12.5 milligrams of sodium, which is well within the Food and Drug Administration’s definition of “very low sodium.” Thus, it’s unlikely that sodium in softened water would pose a risk for most healthy people.

 However, if you’re on a very low-sodium diet and you’re concerned about the amount of sodium in softened water, you may want to consider a water-purification system that uses potassium chloride instead. Another option is to soften only the hot water and use unsoftened cold water for drinking and cooking.

You Need Sodium to Soften Water

If any level of salt in any of your water concerns you, you can consider one of Culligan’s salt-free solutions that use potassium chloride. Although these do not eliminate the minerals that cause hard water, a salt-free system transforms the minerals chemically so they will not scale.  This is technically called “water conditioning,” though it identifies as a “Salt-Free Water Softener.”

Water Softeners Filter Lead and Other Harmful Impurities

Water softeners can get rid of certain minerals that harm your Philadelphia area home, but that doesn’t mean your water is safe from other dissolved solids or harmful bacteria. If you would like all the benefits of a water softener with the best quality tap water, consider adding a Culligan Reverse Osmosis drinking water system or Whole House Water Filter for as little as $10 a month*.

 

*prices, rules and restrictions vary with dealer location

The Importance of a Culligan Inspect n’ Check on Your Water Softener

Besides the occasional refill of salt, your water softener system is not something you think of regularly maintaining. Like most salt based water softeners, the process of how they work is pretty simple. Your hard water flows into the resin tank, the resin tank, which holds resin beads, absorbs all of the “hard” water minerals as they pass through which then allows only “soft” water to go through the system. After some time of this process, the tank does become full of these minerals and needs to be cleaned or “recharged.”

Some signs of your water softener system beginning to lose its momentum may include dry skin, water build up in your sink and bathtub, as well as having to use more soap to get your clothes and dishes spotless. If you are experiencing these symptoms, the best way to resolve the issue is to call your local Culligan Man. Your Culligan Man will come to your home, inspect your system, and diagnose the best solution. Having a Culligan water professional inspect and check your system on a regular basis can prolong the life of your Culligan Water Treatment system as well as save you money. When your water softener system works like it should, it cuts back on money spent on cleaning products and energy bills.

Even if you have a system from a big box store, Culligan will still service it. Culligan will service ANY make and ANY model because Culligan cares about the water in your home! Call your local Culligan water professional at 855- Hey-Culligan-Man!

Chloramine vs. Chlorine Water Treatment

Information On Chlorine & Chloramine

All municipalities are required to make sure their water is treated for bacteria and safe for human consumption. Historically, chlorine has been the chemical used for this purpose, but in recent years, many municipalities have moved to chloramine for anti-bacterial protection. Chloramine is a combination of chlorine and ammonia. Both chlorine and chloramine add a noticeable, distinct taste and odor that many people find distasteful.

How Do You Treat Chlorine & Chloramine?

Culligan Water TreatmentTypically, carbon-based filters can be used to remove both chlorine and chloramine in the home before the water is used for drinking or cooking. This removes the taste of the chlorine and chloramine, while still allowing them to act as antibacterial agents in your water. However, home owners must be careful to choose the correct type of carbon filter. While standard carbon filters will treat chlorine, these standard carbon filters will not remove chloramine. A special type of carbon is required to treat chloramine, and most local big-box and hardware stores do not carry these types of carbon filters.

Culligan Treats Chlorine & Chloramine

Culligan knows how to treat both chlorine and chloramine, and it also knows what treatment solutions to use in your area. The removal of chlorine and chloramine can be accomplished with either a Culligan “point-of-use” (POU) filter – typically under sink – or a Point of Entry Whole House Filter  – attached to your home’s main water supply. Let Culligan make a recommendation as to which is best for your situation, and trust Culligan’s expertise to know how to treat your local water. Contact your local Culligan Man to make sure you get the best possible water for your home and family.

Dry Skin In The Fall? Hey Culligan Man!

Fall is in full swing and is bringing colder weather with it. That colder weather is bringing dryer air, and that dryer air means dryer skin. Everyone knows that dry skin can be a pain, but did you know that there’s something you can take to help prevent your skin from drying out? Treat your water.

Hard water can be a nuisance. It can smell bad, it can taste bad, and it can leave unsightly stains in your house. It can also exacerbate the effects of the cold, dry air in these cooler seasons, only making your dry, itchy skin worse. But Culligan has a solution: its renowned water softeners.

Culligan Lady Saying 'Hey Culligan Man!'For the past 70+ years, Culligan has been an industry leader in providing homes across the nation with leading water softening solutions and technology. And your home can be the next one to feature one of Culligan’s leading solutions.

But how would one get one of Culligan’s water treatment solutions in his or her home? Easy! Contact your local Culligan Man to schedule a free water test. Your Culligan Man will then be able to make recommendations on a personalized solution for your home. Connect today and say, “Hey Culligan Man!”

Recommended Reads: Water Treatment For Dummies

Water Treatment For DummiesIf you’re looking for great information on Water Treatment, we recommend checking out Water Treatment For Dummies from the Water Quality Association. This is a great resource for people interested in learning what water treatment is all about. It discusses topics ranging from where your water comes from to the benefits of good quality water. It also discusses how to determine what’s in your water, whether your water is hard or soft, and when you should call in the experts for help with your water treatment. The book concludes with questions you should ask your water treatment company.

In addition to checking out the book to learn about water treatment, you can also check out the resources we’ve provided on our website. Whether you want to learn about water softening, drinking water, or why your water smells like rotten eggs or leaves rust-colored stains in your sink, your local Culligan Man can help. You can also use our website to schedule an in-home water analysis to get water treatment recommendations from your local Culligan Man himself, in person. Check out our website’s content and fill out a form or give us a call to learn about the best water treatment options for you, your family, and your home.